Despite crime, Millennials are flocking to the Crescent City

Jazz Fest crowds flock to the Fair Grounds for Stevie Wonder on May 6.
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NEW ORLEANS -- Despite a reputation for crime and violence, Time Magazine reports that millennials are moving to New Orleans en-masse.

According to the report, New Orleans ranks fifth in the country when it comes to attracting millenials.

Tourism commercials make Louisiana seem like a warm and inviting place, but what they don’t tell you is our state is the second most dangerous in the country according to one study. Another study rates Louisiana as the third worst state economically. New Orleans aligns with those trends.

But still, millenials are moving to Louisiana in a big way.

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Kanako Richard is a millennial and an entrepreneur. Richard runs Kawaii NOLA, a store selling cosplay and Japanese “cute culture” items on Magazine Street.

“Most of my customers are adults,” Richard said. “I would say in the age from of 20-to-40.”

Richard has lived all over, but one thing that made her stay in New Orleans and set up shop was the culture.

"Being in New Orleans we love to celebrate life,” she said.

Professor Walter Lane with the University of New Orleans says the City’s unemployment is high, but essentially millenials are still coming because they “dig the place.”

“I think the culture explains why this cohort of people are choosing to move here,” Lane said. He also said they're great for the economy. “They’re bigger than the baby boomers.”

Without the attraction to culture, another millennial and local software engineer may not be here.

"We have an office in Newport Beach California,” Sid Brown said, but he’s trying to bring more tech to the Crescent City. “Especially in the creative space the city has so much culture we kind off pull off that.”

And Michael Hecht with the Greater New Orleans Inc. which works to recruit business growth, points out that, for a big city, we’re competitive in cost of living.

"Simply put we're 30-or-40 percent less expensive than a New York or a San Francisco," Hecht said.

And if New Orleans had less crime?

“It always helps,” Hecht said.