Study: Short-term rentals on the rise in N.O.

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NEW ORLEANS -- New data shows in 15 New Orleans neighborhoods, short term rentals make up 3 percent of properties. Some permanent residents are fed up, while others see it as a way to earn some extra cash.

Matt Easley has lived in the Marigny for the last 40 years and recently he's watched a number of residents move out and short term rentals move in.

A study from The Lens and Huffpost estimates that in the Marigny, 1-in-10 homes are now short term rentals.

Easley says it's completely changed the neighborhood.

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"What happened in the Quarter over a period of years is now happening here,” Easley said. “There are only two houses occupied on the entire block. Everything else is Airbnb."

Easley says he wouldn't mind if property owners rent out a bedroom, but The Lens found 70 percent of short term rentals in New Orleans are for the full house.

"They rent to groups they rent to 12-or-15 people,” Easley said.

Tonie Krosky is part of one of those groups. She and nine of her friends rented out an AirBnB in Treme.

"For fun,” Krosky said. “We wanted to come for Halloween and get all dressed up."

She understands why some residents are wary of short-term rental visitors, but thinks neighbors and tourists can learn to live side-by-side.

"As long as guests are respectful and the owners hold them accountable there shouldn't be any issues," Krosky said. "And it's your home you should be able to do what you want."

Cherie Alwell relies on short term rentals for a paycheck and says many New Orleans residents also depend on the service.

"Since I work at an Airbnb I really love that it brings jobs, it brings opportunities for the people who work here, for the people who live here so they can pay their mortgages and stuff,” Alwell said.

Easley understands the positives, but says there has to be a balance or else historic New Orleans neighborhoods will disappear.

“That's not good for the neighborhood and what it's doing is eliminating people who will want to stay,” Easley said.

Since the city began processing applications, more than 3,000 short term rental licenses have been approved.