Trombone Shorty wows Grammy audience but doesn't bring home award

Trombone Shorty wows Grammy audience but doesn't bring home award

Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews

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by Dominic Massa / Eyewitness News

wwltv.com

Posted on February 13, 2011 at 6:07 PM

Updated Sunday, Feb 13 at 6:28 PM

LOS ANGELES – New Orleanian Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews and his band wowed the audience with a performance at the Grammy Awards pre-show webcast Sunday afternoon, but will have to wait for another chance to bring home an award.

Andrews was one a handful of artists with Louisiana connections who were nominated, but did not earn awards during Sunday’s pre-show ceremony.

 

He was nominated in the best contemporary jazz category for his breakthrough album “Backatown.” The award instead went to the Stanley Clarke band.

 

Andrews performed in the pre-telecast ceremony, during which nearly 100 awards were presented. The prime-time awards show airs Sunday at 7 p.m. on CBS and WWL-TV Channel 4.

 

Louisiana native bluesman Buddy Guy, who was born in Pointe Coupee Parish, did take home an award, in the best contemporary blues album category.  He beat out New Orleans music icon Dr. John, who was up for his sixth Grammy award, for “Tribal,” the album recorded with his band “The Lower 911.”  While he did not bring home a Grammy, Dr. John will be inducted next month into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

 

Also Sunday afternoon, Louisiana native Chubby Carrier and his Bayou Swamp Band earned a Grammy award in the Best Zydeco or Cajun music album, for “Zydeco Junkie.”

 

Music from the HBO New Orleans-based series “Treme” was nominated in two categories but did not win any awards. 

 

The show was nominated in the category of best compilation soundtrack, and best song written for motion picture or television, for “This City.” The season-ending song, composed by Steve Earle, produced by T Bone Burnett and featuring arrangements by Grammy winner Allen Toussaint, was also nominated for an Emmy earlier this year.

 

Earle was nominated in the same category as songwriter Randy Newman.  Newman, who lived in New Orleans as a child and is a frequent performer here, did not win in the best song category, where he was nominated for “Down In New Orleans,” from “The Princess and the Frog,” the Disney film set in New Orleans.  But Newman did take home a Grammy for best score soundtrack album for motion picture, television or other media, for “Toy Story 3.”

 

New Orleans might have been able to boast of another native Grammy winner Sunday, had Wynton Marsalis been honored with what would have been his tenth award, for best improvised jazz solo. 

 

But the winner, jazz great Herbie Hancock, does have a New Orleans connection. Hancock is chairman of the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz at Loyola University. Sunday’s win earned him his 13th Grammy award.

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