Eat Local Challenge back for 4th year, Coquette makes squash blossom beignets

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wwltv.com

Posted on June 5, 2014 at 12:56 PM

WWLTV.com
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The New Orleans "Eat Local Challenge" is back for its fourth year, and the goal is to support local farmers and make a positive impact on the environment and the economy.

You can meet the challenge by shopping at farmer's markets, or by eating at any of the dozens of restaurants who are offering special dishes of all local ingredients, and there are some perks for participating, so joining the Eyewitness Morning News with details on the challenge are the owner and pastry chef from one of the participating restaurants, Coquette, Michael Stoltzfus and Zak Miller.

It is not too late to become a locavore yourself, as the Eat Local Challenge lasts until June 29, and you can do the challenge at your own pace. There are four levels, with ultrastrict being the highest and there's pretty much no cheating there, then there is the strict level, lenient, and ultra lenient, whatever fits your lifestyle works.

For more information, click here.


Coquette's Squash Blossom Beignet with Creole Cream Cheese and Honey

Beignet batter

  • 3 1/2 oz. All Purpose Flour
  • 2 oz. Cornstarch
  • 1 1/2 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3/4 tsp Ground Cinnamon
  • Sparkling water

Whisk all the dry ingredients to combine. Add enough sparkling water to for a loose batter ( a little thinner than pancake batter).

  • Oil for frying
  • Progress Dairy Creole Cream Cheese
  • Honey
  • 6 to 8 squash blossoms
  • Bee Pollen to taste (Optional)
  • Powdered Sugar

Heat the oil to 360 degrees. Separate the squash blossoms into 4 to 6 strips. Discard the stamen. Gently dip the Squash blossom into the batter and scrape off the excess to for a light coating. Drop into the fryer and fry 1 and 1/12 to 2 minutes each side or until light golden brown. Drain on paper towels and dust with powdered sugar. Place the Creole cream cheese in a small bowl and top with honey and bee pollen.

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