Napoleon: Four places with good eats for a good cause

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wwltv.com

Posted on January 18, 2013 at 10:15 AM

We continue a series to help connect some of your New Year’s resolutions to the New Orleans dining world. This time, it’s about helping others, a noble cause that we now have more ways to pursue even just by going out for lunch. There has been a rise in the number of nonprofit cafes and culinary businesses around town, places where you can get a good meal while putting your dining dollar to work for a greater good. Here are four examples:

Café Reconcile

1631 O.C. Haley Blvd., New Orleans, 504-568-1157

Since opening in 2000, this Central City institution has served as a lunch spot, a teaching kitchen and a career training program for young people who want to turn their lives around. Hundreds of students have completed the program, learning marketable job skills and going on to internships and jobs within the city’s hospitality industry. Café Reconcile is now wrapping up a major renovation, which should be done by the end of the month. When it reopens, you’ll find a much larger café, an outdoor courtyard and a state-of-the-art kitchen, plus a new events hall upstairs. Check with the café for the official reopening date.

Vintage Garden Kitchen

925 S. Labarre Rd., Metairie, 504-620-2495

Arc of Greater New Orleans is a long-standing social services agency that helps people with mental disabilities. One tool the group created is Vintage Garden Kitchen, an enterprise that grows fresh vegetables and turns them into hearty, nourishing soups. You can also find them at the Crescent City Farmers Market in Mid-City (3700 Orleans Ave.) on Thursdays, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Uptown (200 Broadway) on Tuesdays, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., selling soup, produce and other items. Later this month, look for a new Vintage Garden Kitchen restaurant to open in the food court of the Place St. Charles building in the CBD (201 St. Charles Ave.).

Café Hope

1101 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 504-756-4673

Café Hope was started by an alum of Café Reconcile and brings a similar teaching café/employment training program to the West Bank. It’s based inside the Hope Haven Center, a campus of Spanish mission-style buildings dating back to the 1930s. The menu focuses on farm-fresh staples and local fish and meats prepared with lots of Louisiana flavor. The menu changes with the seasons, but the three-course lunch for $15 is always a good bargain.

Liberty’s Kitchen

422 S. Broad St., New Orleans, 504-822-4011

Another example of the teaching kitchen/employment preparedness program, also created by another Café Reconcile veteran, Liberty’s Kitchen runs a café and coffee shop in Mid-City. It also has expanded with a pioneering Healthy School Lunch Program, bringing better nutrition to the public school cafeteria and increasing its job opportunities for its own students. Drop by the café for lunch, and you’ll find a menu of fresh, affordable dishes of Southern flavors (try the shrimp and cheese grits), baked goods and coffee from the Starbucks line. The walls are lined with portraits of recent grads, a reminder that your lunch helps fund programs for the students coming up behind them.

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