Shrimp, Potato, Crabmeat and Corn Soup

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wwltv.com

Posted on June 23, 2011 at 3:30 PM

1/3 cup butter
1/2 cup all purpose flour
2 cups whole milk
2 cups heavy cream
2 cups frozen or canned whole kernel corn (young, sweet variety)
2 cups cream corn
1 cup finely chopped green onions
1 lb. fresh lump or claw crabmeat
1 lb. raw shrimp (36-40 count, peeled and de-veined)
1 lb. pre-boiled, peeled, red potatoes, small dice
1/2 tsp. white pepper
1/2 tsp. Frank Davis Seafood Seasoning
1 Tbsp. soy sauce
2 cups concentrated potato or shrimp stock, if necessary
1/4 cup minced parsley

First off, take a heavy aluminum or stainless steel stockpot or oval roaster and melt down the butter over a medium heat. Then, a little at a time, add the flour and whisk it around gently until combined with the butter…but DO NOT LET THIS MIXTURE DARKEN at all. (You’re making a true French roux and it’s never supposed to brown!)

Next, stir in the finely minced mirapoix of vegetables—the onions, celery, garlic, parsley, and green onion mix you can find pre-packed in the produce department of most grocery stores). The veggies will further prevent the roux from browning and the residual heat from the flour will soften and cook them to the proper degree.

Now it’s at this point that you gradually pour in the milk, stirring continuously until it starts to simmer. Then add the heavy cream and stir it gently into the mix until well blended (figure this should take you—on a low fire—about, say, 10 minutes or so). Then when the soup base is smooth and silky, add the kernel corn, the cream corn, and the green onions and cook everything for about 5 minutes or until the kernel corn is “just tender”, but, again, stirring occasionally.

This is when the crabmeat, the shrimp, the potatoes, the white pepper (it is okay to toss in a little cayenne if you want to!), the seafood seasoning, and the soy sauce go into the soup. Then once everything is added to the pot, simmer it (taking special care that the soup doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot and burn) until it is very hot and small bubbles start to form around the edge of the pot (I’d say you want to simmer the soup for about 10 to 15 minutes). Once again, stir the soup frequently. (BUT DON’T EVER LET IT COME TO A BOIL!)

Finally, just before dishing it out piping hot in soup bowls, re-adjust all the seasonings to your taste (and stir in a tad bit of the reserved potato stock if the soup is a little too thick to your liking). Then when you’re ready to eat, garnish each bowl you ladle out with a sprinkle of minced parsley and serve immediately. Aw, man!!! This is come good!!!

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Chef’s Notes:

If you intend to use fresh-shucked corn, use about four or five large cobs. First, with a sharp knife, cut the kernels from the cob; then scrape the cobs with a tablespoon for the “corn milk” and add the scrapings to the soup.

It’s okay to substitute canned crabmeat for fresh-picked crabmeat if you have to…but under no circumstances should you even think of using imitation crabmeat!

Don’t be tempted to use Idaho white potatoes for this soup. The best flavor and consistency comes from red Irish potatoes. Oh—and I also suggest that you reserve the potato-boiling water; it has potato starch (and flavor) in it and makes a really nice soup base.

I recommend you make your own shrimp stock from the shells and heads. But if that isn’t possible for whatever the reason, use this little chef’s trick…instead of stock substitute bottles of pasteurized clam juice. It is available at most major supermarkets.

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