Consumer Reports warning on spray-on sunscreens

Consumer Reports warning on spray-on sunscreens

Credit: WTSP

A new warning, issued by Consumer Reports, warns parents of the potential dangers of chemicals in spray-on sunscreens that can be inhaled in kids' lungs.

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by Isabel Mascareñas, WTSP

wwltv.com

Posted on July 11, 2014 at 11:51 AM

VIRGINIA BEACH-- A new warning is out for parents about the sunscreen they use on their kids. Consumer Reports recommends parents stop using the spray-on sunscreens for now until more research is done about possible chemicals kids may be taking into their lungs.

On Virginia Beach's Oceanfront, protecting his daughter Kerrigan from the sun's rays is a priority for Tommy Hooker.  He says the sunrays must be a bigger threat than spray-on sunscreen.

Easier to use, sure, but are they safer?

Consumer Reports says maybe not.

It recommends parents put spray-on sunscreens on hold and wait for an FDA study on chemicals found in spray-on sunscreens that may contain small particles known to cause developmental problems in animals' lungs. The chemicals are titanium dioxide and zinc oxide.

Click here to read Consumer Reports warning.

 

 

 
Dr. Joseph Toland of Northshore Pediatrics in Virginia Beach says in his 40 years of practice he has never had an asthmatic patient have an attack triggered due to spray on sunscreen.

"I've had more kids have an attack from the chlorine fumes coming from indoor pools. Just use your common sense on this one. You can still use it. Just know you should never spray any chemical in a child's face," Toland said. 
 
The bottle says not to spray onto child's face. But Dr. Toland says he knows many times convenience can beat common sense.

Keely Biladeau says these sunscreens give her fair skin the best protection, but at a cost because she's asthmatic.

"It's not very good, because you start coughing a little bit. But it's a good warning to have at least," Biladeau says.

But is it enough of warning to get her to switch?

"Yeah," she says, "because of the warning and being asthmatic, I don't want to put myself at risk."

Instead of spraying the sunscreen onto your child's skin, Consumer Reports suggests spraying it on your hand first, then rubbing it on their bodies. When using the spray-on sunscreens adults should avoid the face area.

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