City seeks aid to help patrol New Orleans

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wwltv.com

Posted on July 1, 2014 at 6:15 PM

Updated Wednesday, Jul 2 at 7:18 AM

Monica Hernandez / Eyewitness News
Email: mhernandez@wwltv.com | Twitter: @mhernandezwwl

NEW ORLEANS – The NOPD says that although it has released video of a ‘person of interest’ in the Sunday morning shooting on Bourbon Street that left 10 people injured, there have been no suspects identified in the case.

“We have to research everything we do before we release a name, a description and bring it to the district attorney for prosecution,” said NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas.

Five people remain hospitalized in the shooting – one in critical condition. The incident received worldwide attention. It’s the third major shooting on Bourbon Street in the past three years. Mayor Mitch Landrieu is calling for state and federal law enforcement on the ground, including a request for 100 state troopers to help patrol the streets.

Governor Bobby Jindal has promised the help of state troopers – through this Fourth of July weekend.

“We serve as the host to the tourism and sports and entertainment industry,” said Landrieu. “We generate hundreds of millions of dollars to the state of Louisiana.”

People who live and work in the French Quarter said there is a need for more officers on a dwindling police force.

“You can’t even count on being able to walk safely down a highly-populated street that’s supposedly one of the most protected streets,” said Meg Lousteau, executive director of the Vieux Carre Property Owners, Residents, and Associates. “You have to wonder if anything is safe.”

Dr. John Penny, a criminologist at the Southern University of New Orleans, sees a trend, when it comes to shootings in highly populated areas of New Orleans.

“They want to send home a message that no matter where you are, if you wrong me, I'm going to kill you and I'm going to make a reputation for myself.”

City officials say they're working to hire more officers, but say curbing shootings also means stopping what Landrieu calls "a culture of violence."

“This is not going to get done until the people of New Orleans demand a safe city,” he said.

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