Professor: Decision Changes 'Political Dynamic'

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Associated Press

Posted on June 25, 2013 at 12:01 PM

A law professor says Chief Justice John Roberts showed his contempt for Congress in the majority opinion that struck down portions of the Voting Rights Act as unconstitutional. (June 25)

AP Television - AP Clients only

WASHINGTON, June 25, 2013

Jonathan Turley, George Washington University Law Professor

SOURCE - RESTRICTION or COURTESY

Location - Date

1. Wide of Supreme Court with demonstrators out front

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Turley, George Washington University Law Professor:

"Well what this means is that Congress is going to have to look at which states will be most suspect and to look at the formula. They can't use the same one they used in 1965."

3. Wide of Supreme Court with assembled media

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Turley, George Washington University Law Professor:

"And this changes the political dynamic for Congress. It's one thing for Congress to just re-up the statute. It's another thing to have to make individual state decisions of who will now be viewed as a suspect state. That's now going to be politically viewed as untenable for many of these members."

5. Mid of demonstrators holding up NAACP signs

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Turley, George Washington University Law Professor:

"The Chief Justice and Justice Scalia really questioned whether Congress had the courage to look at the list of states. They said that no member of congress would vote against a statute with this title. And there's a level of contempt of congress in the political sense that comes out of this opinion. The justices simply felt that congress took the politically expedient measure and did not look at the actual formula of what states would be affected."

7. Mid of reporters taking notes

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