Group that lost family members to violence speaks out on Father's Day

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wwltv.com

Posted on June 18, 2012 at 7:13 AM

Updated Monday, Jun 18 at 7:22 AM

WWLTV.com
Email: webteam@wwltv.com | Twitter: @WWLTV

NEW ORLEANS - On Father's Day, a group of people with a common, painful bond gathered for support and to speak out against a major problem that continues plaguing the city.

The group, which was mostly made up of family members who have lost loved ones to murder, said strong families are critical to curtailing the violence.

"What is it that makes people kill people?" Eloise Williams said.

It's a question Williams, whose son was murdered in 1983, has wrestled with for decades. She said she's affected by each and every killing in the city.

"I hurt every day when the television opens and young men and women are being murdered, so it goes deep for me. So, I do what I can do to say, 'Let's bring some healing to family members,'" Williams said.

Sunday was one of those opportunities, as Williams invited family members and friends of other murder victims to join her for a special Fathers Day get together.

One of many messages shared by the group is the importance of parenting when it comes to guiding young men down the right path.

"Well, I feel like the fathers should take charge of your children - know what they're doing and where they are, because I mean, they're running rampant,"  said Rebecca Glover.

Glover lost her own son to violence, and her nephew, Henry Glover, died in a well-known post-Katrina police-involved incident.

She said violence continues to tear the city apart.

"We got to stop all of this. I don't know what it's gonna take to stop this. I mean, because our young blacks are dying on the streets, even our babies, you know, they're not safe anymore," Glover said.

While those at Sunday's event were focused on the idea of a safer city in the future, they also spoke out in support of those affected by unsolved crimes.

"Right now we're in the midst of cold cases, to make sure all of these cold cases that have been sitting dormant for so many years - that these cases have to be opened, family members have to get justice. You can't get healing if you can't get justice," Glover said.

Williams has been organizing events for loved ones of murder victims since her son's death.

 

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