American kids get poor marks on physical fitness

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wwltv.com

Posted on May 1, 2014 at 6:01 PM

Meg Farris / Eyewitness News
Email: mfarris@wwltv.com | Twitter: @megfarriswwl

NEW ORLEANS - The first ever national report card on physical fitness has been released and the grade is dismal. American kids earned a near failing grade. And the results can mean lifelong problems.

U.S. children received a D- when it comes to overall physical activity. 

"It's so close to an F that it's really, really concerning. And the message I really want parents to hear: it's not an option for your children to have physical activity. They need it so that they can develop properly," said Dr. Melinda Sothern of the LSUHSC School of Public Health. She is the Director of Behavioral Health, Professor of Research and a Clinical Exercise Physiologist and Professor.

Dr. Sothern was one of only 11 experts who gathered the scientific data for the first ever U.S. report card on physical activity for children and youth. It was presented at a congressional fitness briefing on Capitol Hill this week. And the findings not only affect being obese, getting diabetes, ADHD, depression, bones, and muscles, but it also changes the brain for life and its ability to learn and form permanent connections to the muscles.

"There are many studies that show that physically fit kids do better in the classroom. They make better grades. They do better on standardized tests," she added.

And not only are children not getting at least the minimum of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a day, they also are getting too much screen time, earning a D in sedentary behaviors. 

"Sedentary behaviors are associated with every social problem, every cognitive problem, every school problem, every health problem there is. The more a child sits, the more likely they are to become obese. The more likely they are to develop diabetes. The more likely they are to have asthma, attention deficit disorder, even autism is related  to sedentary behaviors," Dr. Sothern explained.

She says change is crucial.

"So my recommendation is to wake up. I don't think that communities, parents, schools, government, industry, understand the reach of just providing children with opportunities to be physically active. It would be the game changer for health," Said Dr. Sothern.

The full and summary reports are available online at http://www.physicalactivityplan.org.

 

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