'We'll never see his kind again'

Print
Email
|

by Monica Hernandez / Eyewitness News

wwltv.com

Posted on December 20, 2010 at 2:33 AM

Updated Monday, Dec 20 at 7:23 AM

NEW ORLEANS -- For those who watched, Nash Roberts, who died Sunday at the age of 92, was the meteorologist with the uncanny accuracy and the felt tipped marker, but for those who knew him, Nash was so much more. 

"Nash was everything," said Garland Robinette, WWL Radio talk show host and former WWL-TV anchor.  "He was rich, he was famous, he was everything. And it had no effect on him whatsoever. He was just the nicest guy in the world. And that made me realize, no matter how well you get known, or what kind of fame you boil down in, you're still where you came from and he was the epitome of that. He was what every person should be."

For many, Roberts' loss marks the end of an era.

"We'll never see his kind again," said Robinette.  

"He was a one of a kind, and his loss, he's irreplaceable, there will never be another Nash Roberts in New Orleans," said Bill Capo, a WWL-TV reporter who first met Roberts at age 10.

Roberts was known for his uncanny accuracy and felt tip marker. He was the only local meteorologist to accurately pinpoint the paths of Hurricanes Betsy and Camille.

"He truly became an icon during hurricane Betsy, everyone became locked into what Nash had to say, from Betsy on, Nash's word was weather law," said Capo.

"I think Nash was not only known here, but he was known nationally, many people would talk about the meteorologist from New Orleans who would make his own hurricane forecast," said Carl Arredondo, WWL-TV chief meteorologist who worked with Roberts from time to time, even after Roberts retired.

"I think everybody always thought he had some kind of little magic wand, but his company represented every airport virtually in the world, and every oil company, so he was kind of a genius in being able to read the same charts everybody else did, and pull something out of it," said Robinette.

But it wasn't just Roberts' just-the-facts way of giving the weather that left a mark on New Orleans.

"Everything he accomplished in life, what he was, was what everybody loved," said Robinette.  "He wasn't just a weatherman. It wasn't the knowledge, it wasn't the ability to make money, there was something magic, that charisma thing that he had and nobody else had, he was a unique, unique man and we're all going to miss him.  If you reach the epitome of the best you can do in life, it's Nash Roberts."

Print
Email
|