New Orleans Saints lose LB Chris Chamberlain for season after ACL tear

New Orleans Saints lose LB Chris Chamberlain for season after ACL tear

Credit: Jonathan Bachman / The Associated Press

New Orleans Saints defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo, front left, pats the helmet of linebacker Chris Chamberlain (56) who is assisted off the field after being injured in the first half of a preseason NFL football game against the Jacksonville Jaguars in New Orleans, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012.

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wwltv.com

Posted on August 18, 2012 at 3:43 PM

Updated Saturday, Aug 18 at 3:57 PM

Bradley Handwerger / WWLTV.com Sports Reporter
Email: bhandwerger@wwltv.com | Twitter: @wwltvsports

Backup New Orleans Saints linebacker Chris Chamberlain’s season is done after he tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee in the second quarter of Friday night’s exhibition game.

The reserve linebacker tweeted the results of his MRI Saturday afternoon, saying, “Definitely been feeling the love of my friends, family and the #WHODATNATION! Unfortunately my season is over but working for 2013 begins!”

Chamberlain’s injury happened in the second quarter on the first play following a Saints turnover. Jacksonville ran running back Montell Owens to the right end with 8 minutes, 52 seconds to go in the first half.

He was stopped for a two-yard gain, but as the play ended, Chamberlain went down, writing in pain. Defensive back Marquis Johnson immediately waved over trainers for help.

Minutes later, Chamberlain was helped off the field.

New Orleans also had receiver Andy Tanner and safety Isa Abdul-Quddus leave the game early with an ankle injury and a concussion, respectively.

Chamberlain signed with the Saints this offseason after four years in St. Louis, including three with Steve Spagnuolo, now the Saints’ defensive coordinator. He was a full-time starter in 2011.

In the opening few weeks of training camp, Chamberlain had been working as a backup weakside and middle linebacker. He also was involved in several of the Saints’ special teams units.

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