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Stuck in the muck - Six weeks after Ida, Lafitte still covered in mud

That thick sludge is clogging drains, culverts, and ditches, creating a mess as workers try and clear it out. No matter where you go you can’t escape it.

LAFITTE, La. — It’s gross, it smells, and there’s a lot of it. 

“At first it was like trying to walk in pudding a foot deep,” said Lafitte resident Kirk Fisher. “That’s just what it looked like, pudding.” 

For folks in Lafitte, the mud pushed in from Hurricane Ida still covers just about every single yard.  

“I sprayed the driveway down four times with the garden hose, took me four hours each time I did it,” said Fisher.

Fisher says he’s never seen mud like what he’s dealing with from a storm.  

“It’s like the swamp just moved to another place,” said Fisher.  

A month and half after Ida, Fisher can only keep his driveway and the area under his house mud free. 

“Not really much I can do out there,” said Fisher, pointing to his yard. “I don’t have the machinery for that.” 

That thick sludge is clogging drains, culverts, and ditches, creating a mess as workers try and clear it out. No matter where you go you can’t escape it.

“When it’s wet, if you try to come with a machine, you move it and it just comes right back where you took it from,” said Fisher.  

Down the road from Fisher’s house, Jerry Bruce was born and raised here and says getting that mud out from under his house, was a chore 

“Under my house I had about a foot of mud,” said Bruce. “I’ve been here since Betsy and I’ve never seen a storm do what this one done.” 

Bruce says it’ll take years to recover from what Ida did and says all the mud in his yard will stay right where it is.  

“I’m keeping this mud. The good Lord gave it to me, I’m keeping it,” said Bruce. “That’s the way I look at it.” 

Not everyone wants to keep it around. Some folks say it’s holding up recovery, debris removal, and getting folks back in their homes.  

“They had people that couldn’t even get to their houses they had so much of it,” said Fisher.  

As some grass begins to grow out of the muck, folks around Lafitte hope it’s a sign the place they call home, will eventually do the same.   

Jefferson Parish leaders say the dry weather helps with cleaning out that mud.  Parish crews and contractors are using vacuum trucks and portable water pumps to help with drainage issues.  

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